The VDI Delusion Book Review

Sitting on a beach in Aruba (sorry, I had to rub that one in), I finished Madden & Company’s take on VDI: The VDI Delusion. The book is from the folks at brianmadden.com, a great resource for all things application and desktop delivery-related.

The book title suggests a bit of animosity towards VDI, but that’s not actually how they feel about VDI. Rather, the delusion isn’t regarding the actual technology of VDI, but the hype surrounding it (and the assumption many have that it’s a solve-all solution).

So the book isn’t necessarily anti-VDI, just anti-hype. They like VDI (and state so several times) in certain situations, but in most situations VDI isn’t warranted nor is it beneficial. And they lay out why, as well as the alternative solutions that are similar to VDI (app streaming, OS streaming, etc.).

It’s not a deep-dive technical book, but it really doesn’t need to be. It talks frankly about the general infrastructure issues that come with VDI, as well as delivering other types of desktop services to users across a multitude of organizations.

It’s good for the technical person (such as myself) who deal in an ancillary way with VDI (I’ve dealt with the network and storage aspects, but have never configured a VDI solution), as well as the sales persons and SE that deal with VDI. In that regard, it has a wide audience.

Brian Drew over at Dell I think summed it up the best:  

For anyone dealing with VDI (who isn’t totally immersed in the realities of it and similar technologies) this is a must-read. It’s quick and easy, and really gets down to the details.

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One Response to The VDI Delusion Book Review

  1. ag4it says:

    The costs and complexity of implementing VDI are reasons why VDI should not be viewed as an “all or nothing” approach, but as part of a wider, more comprehensive virtualization strategy that includes other technologies such as Terminal Server. The fact is that Terminal Server has advantages over VDI, while VDI also has advantages over Terminal Server. That’s why most
    organizations are best served by adopting a hybrid approach, with an optimal mix of Terminal Server (for task-oriented users),

    VDI (for power users), and Blade PCs (stock traders, graphic designers, etc.) which delivers the most benefit and platform flexibility to the organization.

    Ericom Software’s PowerTerm WebConnect facilitates this hybrid approach by managing access to Terminal Server, VDI and Blade PCs with one management tool.

    For more info and to download a free evaluation visit:
    http://www.ericom.com/vdi_wts.asp?URL_ID=708

    Adam

    Note: I work for Ericom

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