Jumbo Fibre Channel Frames

In the world of Ethernet, jumbo frames (technically any Ethernet frame larger than 1,500 bytes) is often a recommendation for certain workloads, such as iSCSI, vMotion, backups, basically anything that doesn’t communicate with the Internet because of MTU issues. And in fact, MTU issues is one of the biggest hurdles with Ethernet jumbo frames, since every device on a given LAN must have the correct MTU size set if you want them to successfully communicate with each other.

What’s less known is that you can also enable jumbo frames for Fibre Channel as well, and that doing so can have dramatic benefits with certain workloads. Best of all, since SANs are typically smaller in scope, ensuring every device has jumbo frames enabled is much easier.

Fibre Channel Frames

Fibre Channel frames typically have a maximum payload size of 2112, and with with headers makes the MTU 2148 bytes. However you can increase the payload up to 9000 bytes, and with headers that 9036 bytes. You can play with the payload size if you like, but just to make it easier I either do regular MTU (2148 bytes) or I do the max for most switches (9036). My perfunctory tests don’t seem to indicate much benefit with anything in between.

Supported

Of course, not all Fibre Channel devices can handle jumbo frames. It’s part of the T10 standard though since 2005, so most modern devices (anything capable of 4 Gbit or more, for the most part). This includes switches from Cisco and Brocade, as well as HBAs from Qlogic and Emulex.

Configuration

The way you configure jumbo frames of course varies, and of course I don’t have lots of different types of equipment, so I’m just going to demonstrate on an MDS that I have access to.

Note: Do not do anything in a production environment until you’ve tested it in a dev environment. If you do otherwise, you’re an idiot.

If you go into an interface configuration, you’ll probably notice there’s no MTU option. That’s because we’re dealing with a fabric here, and the MTU is set per VSAN, not per port. Multi-VSAN ISLs (TE_Ports) will do multiple MTUs without any problem. Keep in mind, changing MTUs on an MDS/Nexus requires a reboot (I think mostly because the N_Ports need to do a new FLOGI). I’m not sure about Brocade, however.

Switch#1# config t 
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z. 
Switch#1(config)# mtu size vsan 10 9036
VSAN 10 MTU changed. Reboot required.
Switch#1(config)# mtu size vsan 20 9036
VSAN 20 MTU changed. Reboot required.
Switch#1(config)# exit 
Switch#1# reload

Right now the maximum MTU size per the standard is 9036 bytes, though it depends on the vendor. Brocade, with it’s Gen 6 FC (32 Gbit) is proposing a maximum MTU size of around 15,000 bytes, though it’s not set in stone yet. It’ll be interesting to see how this all plays out, that’s for sure.

Testing

How well does it work? I haven’t tested it for VDI or otherwise high-IOPs environments, but my suspicion is that it’s not going to help. Given the longer serialization, it would actually probably hurt performance. For other workloads, such as backups, they can make a dramatic difference. As a test, I did a couple of vSphere Storage vMotions, and I was surprised to see how fast it went.

Hosts were B200 M2 blades, with 96 GByte of RAM running EXI 5.1.  Fibre Channel cards were Cisco M81KR, configured for 9036 byte frames (9,100 bytes on the FCoE interface since VICs are CNAs, so had to add several dozen bytes for FCoE headers/VNTAG, etc.). The FC switch was actually a Cisco 6248 Fabric Interconnect set for Fibre Channel switching mode. All tests were done on the A fabric. I initiated Storage vMotions on a 2 TB VMDK file. The VMDK wasn’t receiving an active workload, so it was mostly idle. I ran the test 20 times for each size, and averaged the results.

svmotion

It’s just a quick and dirty test on a barely-active VMDK, but you can see that with 9000 Byte FC frames, it’s almost twice as fast.

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2 Responses to Jumbo Fibre Channel Frames

  1. Erik Smith says:

    April fools! I wish I saw this earlier, I would have posted corroborating test results!

  2. George Dundon says:

    Of course everybody knows that the frame size is negotiated during port log between the storage and the HBA so without mentioning the storage the Hans Christian element was obvious

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